CONSEQUENCES FOR YOU AND OTHERS Loading...

Now, begin to translate insights on environmental challenges and big trends into the sSWOT framework, starting with Threats, by asking:
Where are environmental challenges creating broad threats to future business value?

Look at direct threats to your company as well as at indirect threats impacting others across the value chain (from raw materials to production and distribution to consumption and disposal).

Consider where environmental challenges, together with other big trends, may result in costs, changes in consumer preferences or other unexpected impacts either upstream (suppliers) or downstream (customers, communities).

Consider where environmental challenges, together with other big trends, may result in costs, changes in consumer preferences or other unexpected impacts.
Look for evidence that multiple companies, industries, customers, and communities are investing time and resources to address these environmental challenges. The College of Estate Management, for example, saw that several competitors were building sustainability into their curriculum in an effort to attract students. This helped reinforce the need to take a close look at how environmental challenges are impacting the real estate and construction industry.

BOX 6
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INSIGHTS FROM ROAD TESTS

Delphi, the global automotive and electronics supplier, used the sSWOT to examine waste management challenges on the horizon. Based on their observations of big trends, they noted important threats in growing markets where recycling infrastructure does not yet exist. They recognized that growing markets with increasing populations, like those in Asia-Pacific, are likely to see increasing pressure on existing landfill space. Meanwhile, they also identified increasing regulatory pressure to increase recycling rates and upward pressure on raw materials as demand increases for scarce resources like water and fuel.

BOX 7
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INSIGHTS FROM ROAD TESTS 

Target, a leading North American retailer, has a well-recognized brand and a wide-range of products. They used the sSWOT to look at specific product areas where environmental challenges could create reputational risks, economic or health impacts to their customers, or disruptions to their supply of raw materials. For example, they looked at the physical impacts of climate change upstream on suppliers in the agricultural industry, as farmers in North America face more frequent droughts and increasing temperatures. They used the sSWOT to help highlight important risks and identify opportunities for sustainable food initiatives.